//
articles

gillconquest

gillconquest has written 12 posts for Extreme Citizen Science blog

Ndima-Kali – A Different Kind of Context

It sometimes feels like every blog post I’ve written for ExCiteS has come from a different fieldsite, and to a large extent that’s true. Over the past three years I’ve engaged with maybe seven or eight different organisations and project ideas across the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo with … Continue reading

The Paris Climate Agreement and Indigenous Rights – a view from the side at COP21

ExCiteS’ two intrepid anthropologists, Gill and Carolina, were reunited for a brief period in Paris during December, each participating in a series of side events attached to the 21st Conference of the Parties on Climate Change, better known as COP21. Carolina, who had travelled all the way to Europe for just a few weeks from … Continue reading

Skydiving, LEGO and my PhD: how I applied Extreme Citizen Science in the Pantanal, Brazil

Guest post by Rafael Chiaravalotti, PhD student in the Department of Anthropology at UCL I never liked extreme things. When I was young my brother was the one that was doing all that – skydiving, parachuting, bungee jumping, he did all this. I, on the other hand, was playing with my LEGO box all time. … Continue reading

Engaging Local Communities in Conservation Research

The sun is getting low on the horizon, and after five long hours of hiking up and down the hilly landscape of the Lefini Reserve in the heat of the day, Maximain, our guide, decides it is time to set-up camp for the night. However, we’ve been following a path made by a group of … Continue reading

ExCiteS in press

Just a quick one from me, but we’re delighted to report that the newly published fourth edition of Wiley’s popular GIS textbook Geographic Information Science and Systems features an example of some of our work in the Congo Basin. Here we are in full-colour, double-page glory:            

Back to the Field – interdisciplinary research in the Congo

Take one computer scientist, one geographer, one anthropologist, two quadcopter drones and eight Android smartphones to the Congo for a month and what do you get? That was the key research question for the latest ExCiteS expedition to Congo-Brazzaville, which got off the ground (quite literally, given the drones) in January 2015. It’s been a … Continue reading

Producing Anthropology, Producing Science: Citizen Science and Emerging Problematics

In the emerging sphere of citizen science, new forms of knowledge production are increasingly reworking scientific boundaries to incorporate lay actors, viewpoints and practices. However, in anthropology the boundaries of knowledge have long been conceptualised and reconceptualised as permeable and place-specific. Addressing the overlaps and engagements between citizen science and anthropology, the panel Producing Anthropology, … Continue reading

Problematic Porcupines and Elephantine Issues

I’ve never yet seen an elephant in the Congo rainforest, and to be honest it’s a little difficult at times to imagine that animals so large can a) hide themselves so effectively or b) even fit at all in amongst the dense mess of trees and brush and leaves that make up the forest’s ground … Continue reading

ASA14 Decennial: Anthropology and Enlightenment

The end of last week saw the decennial gathering of the Association of Social Anthropologists of the UK and Commonwealth, with a host of plenaries, panels, films and events loosely themed around the legacy that the Scottish Enlightenment has had on the discipline. I wasn’t presenting at the conference myself, but was given the opportunity … Continue reading

Setting the Scene – Some Citizen Cyberscience Summit Day 1 Highlights

The three day Citizen Cyberscience Summit, which UCL ExCiteS is co-organising alongside the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, Citizen Cyberlab and the Mobile Collective, kicked off to an action-packed start yesterday at the Royal Geographic Society in London. Over the course of the first day (the most academic of the three) almost 40 talks were delivered by … Continue reading

Where are you visiting us from?